Resolve Now to Avoid These 7 Deadly Relationship Mistakes

It’s the time of year that people focus on the changes they want to make in the new year. Like so many others, we have some suggestions for you. Ours are focused on making your relationship better and more fulfilling, not just for this year, but for the rest of your life!

We’ve expressed our ideas in the form of things you should stop doing. If you’re not doing any of these things, why are you reading this? But really, we find that at least one of these issues tends to resonate with most of the folks we talk to, and many can find multiple “ah-ha’s” among this list. Read on, then, and we hope you have a great relationship year!

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#1 Settling for an unsatisfactory sex life – and not talking about it!

Recent research demonstrates that nearly half of both men and women are unsatisfied with the frequency of sex within their relationship. Decades of research shows that sexual satisfaction within a relationship is very closely tied to overall relationship satisfaction. But many people are either afraid or otherwise unwilling to discuss their dissatisfaction with their partner.

We strongly recommend recommitting to a vital, active sex life within your relationship, and that starts with talking about it! Explore what you want in your sexual relationship, find out what your partner wants, and then agree to find ways to work toward satisfying each other’s needs. We know this isn’t as simple as it sounds, but neither is it as difficult as we often imagine it to be. The hardest part is often getting the conversation started, but the payoff will be well worth it.

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#2 Keeping secrets because you’re afraid to share

Oscar Wilde said, “The one charm about marriage is that it makes a life of deception absolutely necessary for both parties.” Makes for an interesting quote, but it’s terrible practice. Yet too many do it, and mostly for the wrong reasons. A gentle but persistent honesty is an important key to building healthy and sustainable relationships.

Achieving real intimacy requires transparency and vulnerability, not deception. But for that to occur, you have to be open and hold truthfulness in high regard. It has to be safe to be truthful! We certainly don’t recommend cruelty or “brutal honesty” – tact and a loving consideration are still essential. But withholding important truths from each other creates a climate of fear and uncertainty in a relationship that is always toxic and destructive in the long run.

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#3 Expecting your relationship to “complete” you

Thanks to fairy tales and popular mythology, too many people go through life as “living tinker toys.” They’re always hoping to find the right other person to join with them to create some magical completeness they don’t feel on their own. If this is your habit, we recommend you give it up. Accept yourself as already complete and whole. You’ll be more attractive to others if you do. You’re also freed up to begin finding others who complement you in one or more aspects of your life and to forge healthy partnerships. You don’t come across as “needy,” and you’re much better positioned to make rational choices about who you get involved with and to what degree.

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#4 Taking it personally

When we live in close proximity with another, there’s a tendency – a carryover from our childhood, when we didn’t know any better – to believe that everything that happens in our lives is a reflection on us, or happens because of us. We should outgrow that, but many of us do not. We continue to believe that “it’s all about us” even if not in a selfish way, but rather in a self-absorbed way. We take every event, comment, or situation in our relationship as somehow reflective of our own self-worth, the strength of our relationship, or the security we want to feel in life. This is a prescription for misery.

One way out of this form of self-limiting belief is to begin questioning these assumptions as they occur. If your partner says or does something you find threatening, pause and reflect on whether it’s really about you, or rather about something altogether separate from your relationship or from you as an individual of worth and value. If you find that the situation truly does warrant a conversation with your partner, you’ll be coming from a better place to have that conversation. If you realize it’s not really about you at all, you’ve spared yourself and your partner a needless annoyance. We like to tell our clients to practice the “Q-TIP rule – Quit Taking It Personally.”

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#5 Expecting your partner to be your companion at every event/activity/pastime you enjoy – whether they enjoy it or not – because “that’s what partners do.”

Our fairy-tale insistence on eternal togetherness often leads to some pretty dismal real world consequences. Research shows that couples often distance themselves from friends and intimates once they become serious about each other. This has the effect of limiting your exposure to viewpoints and observations that are not forged in the white hot crucible of your blossoming partnership. Over time, the partnership stabilizes and grows routine, but your outside friendships and connections have withered away. This in turn creates a dynamic where we expect our partner to fulfill the role of “best friend” in ways that are ultimately unhealthy and destructive of the relationship.

Humans are social animals. We’re not wired to huddle up in isolated pairs. This is a construct created within the last 100 years in western culture. A healthy relationship is one in which both partners maintain and nurture strong friendships outside the pair. We should refrain from expecting our partners to share every interest, hobby, and enthusiasm, and look instead to others for that social input. We return to our partnership enthusiastic and refreshed by our interactions with others, and we avoid imposing on our partners in ways that actually erode closeness and true intimacy.

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#6 Dodging tough conversations about important concerns

As with sex, there are a number of other sticking point issues in every relationship that people are reluctant to talk about. A small number of these will resolve themselves, for better or worse, but most of them won’t. If you’re unwilling to have the conversation, you can count on things not getting better most of the time. You have to ask yourself if the pain caused by the underlying issue is greater than the perceived potential pain of confrontation that keeps you silent.

We find that many times, the “air clearing” conversation actually strengthens, rather than erodes, the relationship, but only if you go about it the right way. A couple of key points: pick the right time for the conversation; have an open mind about the outcome; be prepared to hear your partner’s point of view; know exactly what it is you’d like to see change and how that would look; remember that you can only change your own thoughts, beliefs and actions; and remember that sometimes, you’re up against something that just isn’t going to change.

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#7 Wasting mental energy trying to change your partner

Speaking of things that won’t change, once again, we really want to emphasize that you can’t actually change your partner. The best you can hope for is – by making needed changes to and for yourself and your thinking – to influence your partner. This is not to say that you can’t respectfully request that your partner do something differently if that would please you or make your life easier in some way. What we do say is that it’s ultimately futile and counterproductive to expect to change your partner’s fundamental approach to life and living by dint of nagging, hectoring, snide comments, or non-specific, blanket demands. At best, you’ll get temporary, grudging compliance; at worst, you’ll get a letter from your soon-to-ex’s attorney.

By following these suggestions, you’ll lay a strong foundation for an enduring and fulfilling relationship. Avoiding these common pitfalls will free up your emotional and mental energy to engage in developing a true partnership that rewards both you and your partner in many ways.

Happy New Year!